angelitos negros


eric / 20 / puerto rico


bobbycaputo:

Thought-Provoking Photos Reveal the Complexities of Life As a Chinese Muslim Woman

For Musilin: Call Her Fatimah, photographer Giulia Marchi traces the experience of modern Chinese Muslim women through 22-year-old Ding Lan, one of the many young people studying at Al-Azhar University in Cairo, Egypt. Mostly in their early twenties, Ding Lan, whose Muslim name is Fatimah, and her peers make the journey from their hometowns throughout the provinces Gansu, Qinghai, Ningxia, and Henan in hopes of building a deeper understanding of their cultural history outside of China, where they make up the minority population. At the university, students study the Koran and Islamic law while learning to read and write in Arabic.

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keyframedaily:

First reviews + teaser.
dekonstruktivisme:

Ann Huybens spring—summer 1998.
Her designs aim to combine exoticism and serenity, nostalgia and desire, chaos and peace. In concrete terms she translates this philosophy into clothes which are designed and made, literally and metaphorically, round the body.  All pieces in her collections can only be ordered to measure. She creates mainly for women, regardless of age, shape or size. 
Her collections always contain sections for afternoons, evenings and nights. Huybens intends this division into three sections to represent the circular course taken by a woman’s life. Her clothing is three-dimensional, wound in a spiral round the body, with no beginning and no end, an unceasing movement. She uses stitching, piping and contrasting colours to emphasise the seams that run round the body. Asymmetric fastenings, details and shapes ensure freedom of movement. A spiral skirt and a tango dress are typical items in her collections. The spiral skirt is a skirt with neither beginning nor end, wound in a spiral round the hips. Her tango dress has a long train that can be tied up by means of a small loop. Let’s dance! 
In her choice of fabrics she is always on the lookout for material that is kind to the skin, and so natural rather than synthetic. Organic prints, embroidery and shot fabrics supply changes in colour as the wearer moves or the light changes. The seven shades of colour appearing on the Tranche de Vie print on silk crêpe, provide an example of her favourite colours, ranging from strong colours to gentle shades. Her love for the organic is so great that she uses natural materials in her designs. Shoes for example are given a ‘drumstick’ heel or made entirely from pony or ostrich leather. (Mink shawls and feather boas, wraparound suede belt 5 metres long)
Ann Huybens: I find a man dressed in a very refined dress the height of eroticism. I go on the assumption that men have the right to wear dresses, to be able to feel very fine materials on their body. It seems to me they have even less freedom than women in how they can move and behave. 

dekonstruktivisme:

Ann Huybens spring—summer 1998.

Her designs aim to combine exoticism and serenity, nostalgia and desire, chaos and peace. In concrete terms she translates this philosophy into clothes which are designed and made, literally and metaphorically, round the body.  All pieces in her collections can only be ordered to measure. She creates mainly for women, regardless of age, shape or size. 

Her collections always contain sections for afternoons, evenings and nights. Huybens intends this division into three sections to represent the circular course taken by a woman’s life. Her clothing is three-dimensional, wound in a spiral round the body, with no beginning and no end, an unceasing movement. She uses stitching, piping and contrasting colours to emphasise the seams that run round the body. Asymmetric fastenings, details and shapes ensure freedom of movement. A spiral skirt and a tango dress are typical items in her collections. The spiral skirt is a skirt with neither beginning nor end, wound in a spiral round the hips. Her tango dress has a long train that can be tied up by means of a small loop. Let’s dance! 

In her choice of fabrics she is always on the lookout for material that is kind to the skin, and so natural rather than synthetic. Organic prints, embroidery and shot fabrics supply changes in colour as the wearer moves or the light changes. The seven shades of colour appearing on the Tranche de Vie print on silk crêpe, provide an example of her favourite colours, ranging from strong colours to gentle shades. Her love for the organic is so great that she uses natural materials in her designs. Shoes for example are given a ‘drumstick’ heel or made entirely from pony or ostrich leather. (Mink shawls and feather boas, wraparound suede belt 5 metres long)

Ann Huybens: I find a man dressed in a very refined dress the height of eroticism. I go on the assumption that men have the right to wear dresses, to be able to feel very fine materials on their body. It seems to me they have even less freedom than women in how they can move and behave. 

ttrincea:

The tattooed chest of a portuguese criminal who died in Lisbon circa 1880. The identity of the man is not known. The tattooed skin was removed from the body to avoid detection in dissections, as the bodies of criminals and outlaws were used for studies. Hundreds of peices of tattooed skin are preserved to this day at the Santa Maria Hospital in Lisbon.

ttrincea:

The tattooed chest of a portuguese criminal who died in Lisbon circa 1880. The identity of the man is not known. The tattooed skin was removed from the body to avoid detection in dissections, as the bodies of criminals and outlaws were used for studies. Hundreds of peices of tattooed skin are preserved to this day at the Santa Maria Hospital in Lisbon.

If Latin America had not been pillaged by the U.S. capital since its independence, millions of desperate workers would not now be coming here in such numbers to reclaim a share of that wealth; and if the United States is today the world’s richest nation, it is in part because of the sweat and blood of the copper workers of Chile, the tin miners of Bolivia, the fruit pickers of Guatemala and Honduras, the cane cutters of Cuba, the oil workers of Venezuela and Mexico, the pharmaceutical workers of Puerto Rico, the ranch hands of Costa Rica and Argentina, the West Indians who died building the Panama Canal, and the Panamanians who maintained it.
—Juan Gonzalez, Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America (via neruda-bro)

(Source: anything-for-selenas)

In Purbalingga, central Java, numerous small workshops represent the first step in a global supply chain. Almost all workers are women, all of them scraping a living by measuring and cutting artificial hair to the requisite size for false eyelashes, and then knitting them onto a thin plastic thread. The job requires intense concentration, often leaving workers with sore eyes and backs. Their financial remuneration for such monotonous work is about $0.04 per pair, sometimes lower. By the time the product reaches Western consumers, the price they pay has often reached $10 a pair – a mark-up of 2,400%.

(Source: southeastasianists)

radicalarchive:

'Black World', Johnson Publishing Company, Chicago, 1972-1974.

barbreyryswells:


Fidel Castro and Malcolm X in Harlem
October 1960

From Robert C. Young’s Postcolonialism: A Very Short Introduction

The most celebrated moment of this long history [of Harlem] came in 1960 when Fidel Castro, having been mistreated in his Midtown Hotel, was invited by Malcolm X to move up to Harlem to stay at the Hotel Theresa. Castro later recalled, “I immediately decided: ‘I will go to Harlem because that is where my best friends are.’” Castro’s first visit to Harlem marked the beginning of a long history of Cuban solidarity with Africa-America, of a warmth and sympathy generated between, as Castro put it, two peoples of the third world—the people of Cuba and the people of the third world of the United States.

barbreyryswells:

Fidel Castro and Malcolm X in Harlem

October 1960

From Robert C. Young’s Postcolonialism: A Very Short Introduction

The most celebrated moment of this long history [of Harlem] came in 1960 when Fidel Castro, having been mistreated in his Midtown Hotel, was invited by Malcolm X to move up to Harlem to stay at the Hotel Theresa. Castro later recalled, “I immediately decided: ‘I will go to Harlem because that is where my best friends are.’” Castro’s first visit to Harlem marked the beginning of a long history of Cuban solidarity with Africa-America, of a warmth and sympathy generated between, as Castro put it, two peoples of the third world—the people of Cuba and the people of the third world of the United States.

medicine:

Carol Riddell - Divided Sisterhood: A Critical Review of Janice Raymond’s The Transsexual Empire

SBTRKT - higher (feat. raury)

(Source: tuuuuunes)

(15,208 plays)
paintdeath:

Auguste Rodin

paintdeath:

Auguste Rodin

Nostalghia | Andrei Tarkovsky

(Source: tarkovskymalick)

Les Amours Imaginaires (2010)

I love you.
I really want to kiss you.
I don’t know why I’m telling you this.

(Source: gollysolverson)

euo:

Be(a)cause of youdaehyun kim

euo:

Be(a)cause of you
daehyun kim

an extremely troubling weakness for stoners